In Memoriam: Elda Rizzotti

On April 9th my mother passed away at the age of ninety of heart failure. She expired her last breath in a Montreal hospital after being transferred from her senior care facility. She felt lost and alone during the last days of her life. None of her children could visit and be at her side because of the lockdown.

Elda Pietrella was born on August 28th 1929, weeks prior to the Crash of 1929 and died at the height of the covid-19 fear of contagion that infected and paralyzed a normally working society.

She lost her father when she was 15. He died while her mother, my grandmother Augusta, was pregnant with my uncle Toni. She was the oldest daughter with one sister and two brothers. After completing her fifth grade she left school to work at a farm in the outskirts of a small town of Provesano in Friuli, Italy, to help support her family. She lived through the folly and devastation of the Second World War.

She met my dad Giuseppe Rizzotti in a neighboring town of Barbeano. They got married on May 7th 1949.

She joined my father in Tangiers International were he had found work. The city where I was born. Two years later political change was brewing under the surface and my father, mother and I went back to Spilimbergo, Italy, were my sister Antoinette was born.

The lack of work in Italy compelled my father to move to Montreal, Canada. Three years later my mother, my sister and I left Naples and sailed across the Atlantic and landed in Halifax, Canada: A long train ride away from Montreal, Quebec.

One year later, in 1957 she gave birth to my brother Jimmy. Her children were born in three different countries/continents.

My dad was a ship. My mother was his harbor…

Last time I saw my mother less than a year ago, she told me about when she was pregnant with me, that women had warned her to get ready for the pains of childbirth. She revealed with a smile that I popped out with ease. She felt no pain, only joy.

She was a beautiful and loving mother, unconditionally devoted to her family, and tough as nails.

I am the intertwining union of my parents genes, the flesh and blood of my mother: A wholly trinity.

She will always live in my heart.

She leaves behind in sorrow, her children: Michael, Antoinette, Jimmy and her grandson Gabriel. And all the people she graced by her presence…

The Only Thing We have to Fear Is Fear Itself

The title of this post is a quote from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s inaugural speech. He was the 32nd president of the USA from 1933 until his death in 1945, spanning the depths of the Great Depression to the end of the WWII.

Fear is the contagious disease we need to fight against. It is infecting people’s mind and bodies; not only our biological bodies but mostly our social bodies.
We are at war with an invisible enemy of biological origins that has generated a global contagion of confinement and retreat, unprecedented in the history of the world.

This fear has propelled a fragmentation of social bodies and set in motion the destruction of world economies. This destruction will degenerate in civil unrest, violence and world conflicts.
Fear alters the perception of reality and incapacitates the ability for individuals to reason normally: Only a minority of people will be infected and die due to diagnosed covid-19, whereas a great majority of people will be infected and affected by the destruction of the economy.
To win the war we must not retreat but face the enemy heads on. Like any war we must move forward and expect casualties.
The propagated remedy so far will be far more destructive to humanity than the biological virus itself.

“The Real Enemy Is Fear Itself”

CUI BONO: Who benefits from propagating the destruction of the economy?And for what reasons?